ABA President Bass visits UHLC to observe post-Harvey legal volunteering efforts 

Sept. 28, 2017 — Hilarie Bass, president of the American Bar Association, came to the University of Houston Law Center on Monday to oversee and assist in the training of volunteer lawyers in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

Richard McElvaney, program director for the Center for Consumer Law at UHLC,  and ABA President Hilarie Bass provided guidance to volunteer attorneys who will be representing victims of Hurricane Harvey.

Richard McElvaney, program director for the Center for Consumer Law at UHLC,  and ABA President Hilarie Bass provided guidance to volunteer attorneys who will be representing victims of Hurricane Harvey.

Her remarks were part of a program, "FEMA and Beyond: Hurricane Harvey Legal Issues," presented by Lone Star Legal Aid and sponsored by the Law Center's Center for Consumer Law and the school's clinical programs. Volunteers were provided with information about FEMA and other legal issues related to Hurricane Harvey.

"Through its young lawyers division, the ABA has a contract with FEMA to provide disaster legal services," Bass said. "The ABA has been on the ground after all the disasters have taken place. It's critical that people who need assistance get it. Much of what's being done by the American Bar Association is to provide volunteer lawyers who give free legal advice to victims of a hurricane."

It marked the first time Bass visited the Law Center during her tenure as ABA president. She is the 141st president in the ABA's history and will serve from 2017-2018. Paulette Brown, the 139th ABA president, delivered the keynote speech at the Law Center's 2016 convocation ceremony.

"It was great to see law students who are all volunteering to help provide assistance to disaster victims," she said.

Additional speakers included Saundra Brown, managing attorney of Lone Star Legal Aid's Disaster Relief Unit, and Martin Mayo of Martin L. Mayo & Associates, who specializes in weather-related insurance claims and lawsuits.

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